Tuesday, June 8, 2010

City of Moncton Begs for Boot Ban

"I'm fed up with this issue and I cannot accept any arguments from staff that there's nothing we can do because this action occurs on private property," said Boudreau.

He added the municipal building inspectors regulate the number of parking spaces rental houses must have on their property, so there must be a way to regulate private parking as well.

He asked city manager Jacques Dubé to prepare a bylaw for the next council meeting June 21.

Until then, he said, he'll be boycotting any businesses that boot.

"This is a straightforward matter. Let's ban those idiotic items!" he said. "This booting stuff is insane."




SOURCE: http://timestranscript.canadaeast.com/news/article/1085208

5 comments:

  1. I feel that this type of business practice is abusive, unethical, and a complete scam based on my experience of getting booted because I didn't buy anything in a restaurant that was closed at the Stores Around Lenox in Atlanta.



    1) Parking signs are small with dense wording where you really have to go up to the sign and study it. Absolutely not conspicuous.

    2) An MPE secretly monitors you and makes sure you absolutely buy something. They don't care if the store was closed or why you didn't purchase. If you didn't buy anything even if you attempted to and couldn't, TOUGH!!! In fact, the most ridiculous thing is that they even admit that you tried to patronize, but couldn't and therefore you have to pay up.

    3) MPE knows and tells you out right that the fine isn't material enough for you to really expend a whole lot of effort and resources trying to plead your case. I was asked repeatedly to think about whether it was worth it to try to make my case over $75?

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  2. ^ "Booting" isn't even a business. It's vigilante justice on private property which is set up to appear as a safe place for the public to park. It's a flytrap.

    Did they take a credit card?

    or CASH only?

    Seriously, this is a major violation of your civil rights. Sue in civil court.

    Jack

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  3. As i am not perfect (not to sure any one is) i have made the mistake in parking in places i was not allowed to! Now i have not had the experience of having a boot put on my truck. if such an event were to occur this is how i look upon the situation, first is that you have put an object onto my vehicle without my permission! since it is now attached to my vehicle it is now mine! Now that this boot is mine i have the right to do what ever it is i choose with it, being as i am an avid 4x4 off road er i happen to have a set of small (in my tool box) oxy and accetelyne cutting torches. A simple blast from the torch now turns this contraption into some extra cash when i take my next load of scrap metal in.

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    Replies
    1. You say if they put a boot on your car then it becomes your boot because it's on your property? Well, wouldn't it stand to reason that the same would apply for the parking lot owner...if the parking lot is his property and you put something on it, like your car, then the car is now his.

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  4. My car was booted plus a $160 dollar fine...you are right, cash only and, i believe it is extortion! don't touch my belongings...yes the boot would be mine ...i would have done the same thing if i had a torch!

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Alasdair Baxter, Nottingham Discusses Clampers in His Area:

"From what I have seen most clampers come from the fringes of the criminal classes. They are of the same ilk as those who come to your door offering to tarmac the drive, demand a huge price and then drive you to your bank to get cash to pay them with.

Why does England and Wales not get in line with Scotland where private clamping is totally illegal."
--

Alasdair Baxter, Nottingham, UK.Tel +44 115 9705100; Fax +44 115 9423263

"Fred" from www.LegalBanter.com :

SOURCE: http://www.legalbanter.co.uk/uk-legal-moderated-legal-topics/24038-illegal-wheel-clamping-legal-recourse.html

"The present legal position of clampers is a scandal and amounts to barely legal extortion in many cases. There is absolutely no excuse for failing to bring in a system of licensing that will regulate them.

We have all heard the horror stories, up to and including the deliberate setting up of tempting-looking sites to entrap the unwary. At up to £300 per victim the costs are easy to recoup.

I recently heard a case in court where the driver of a clamper truck was seen by the police to clamp a vehicle, whereupon they checked him over. It turns out that he has no licence, and his truck is uninsured. He then tried to give the officers false details, and only adjusted his attitude when they handcuffed him and put him in the police vehicle. He then failed to turn up to court, and I issued a warrant for his arrest.

The Government needs to find time for a short Bill bringing in licensing of clampers, with a proper code of practice. Perhaps a private member will oblige?"

"My point has nothing to do whether clamping is legal - it obviously is. What has happened though is that some clamping firms are in the extortion business rather than that of parking control.

In my area a car was towed away within four minutes of being left and the owner was told that it would cost him £385 to get his car (which was in an adjacent street) back.

Clampers have threatened and intimidated old and vulnerable people. All I am asking is that clampers are properly licensed, checked for criminal backgrounds, and that their behaviour be subject to a code of practice.

My story about the unlicensed and uninsured clamper who then tried to get arsy with the police was to illustrate what some of the clampers are like. They should be controlled."

Krissie Labanauskas "Car-Boot Racket; Old Navy Chicago, 60290"

"No Savings Here!"

"...Had a terrible experience here. Parked with intention of using coupon at Old Navy but had to use the restroom before shopping so ran across street to Starbucks....On way to shop at Old Navy, saw boot on my car! Store managers claim their hands are tied and cannot do anything regarding their customers being booted.

Car next to me was booted as well, when they had already shopped at Old Navy, one person was still in Old Navy at time of boot, and three others ran to Starbucks for a drink.

All in all, I paid $115 to remove boot...terrible experience, did not use coupon or shop at store after being rudely dismissed by manager.

No discretion to help out customers regarding boots sounds like a bunch of b*** s*** OR terrible corporate management/policy. Either way, avoid this store and certainly avoid the lot. Global Parking Management Inc. supposedly runs the lot.

March 17, 2009 by Krissie Labanauskas in Chicago, IL